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Author Dalley, J.
Title Tranquility mapping for soundscape management: From concept to reality Type
Year 2018 Publication Monitoring and Management of Visitor Flows in Recreational and Protected Areas – ABSTRACT BOOK Abbreviated Journal
Volume MMV 9 - Proceedings Issue Pages 367-370
Keywords MMV9
Abstract The search for tranquil environments is often the chief reason people give for escaping urban settings for the ‘natural’ environments of Protected Natural Areas (PNA). Over time, it became apparent to all stakeholders that both the management and monitoring mechanisms were increasingly ineffective and iniquitous in the preservation and allocation of natural soundscapes, and that a new approach was required. Following an extensive scoping study, the Tranquility Rating Prediction Tool (TRAPT) was proposed as the most appropriate solution for DOC’s future soundscape management and monitoring requirements (Watts, Pearse and Donohue, 2016).
Call Number Serial 4164
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Author Dalley, J.
Title Tranquility mapping: A tool for the equitable allocation of soundscapes in protected areas Type
Year 2016 Publication Monitoring and Management of Visitor Flows in Recreational and Protected Areas – ABSTRACT BOOK Abbreviated Journal
Volume MMV 8 - Proceedings Issue Pages 451-453
Keywords MMV8
Abstract It is well recognised that advanced industrialised societies have become progressively ‘noisy’ over time. This has led to the health and wellbeing benefits of tranquil spaces becoming increasingly recognised – and valued – around the world. Indeed, the search for tranquil environments is often the chief reason people give for escaping urban settings for ‘natural’ environments. Tranquillity in natural environments is a combination of both ‘natural’ landscapes – and ‘natural’ soundscapes. The preservation and conservation of natural environments therefore requires the management of not just natural landscapes and ecosystems, but also their associated soundscapes. Natural soundscapes are finite: at any place and time the soundscape is 100% ‘natural’ unless affected by ‘unnatural’ human-caused sounds. Therefore, the primary challenge to preserving and conserving natural soundscapes in protected areas is the management of unwanted human-caused sound – or ‘anthropogenic noise’.
Call Number Serial 4003
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